Behringer Hellbabe HB01

Behringer Hellbabe HB01


Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price: $44.99

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User Reviews of the Behringer Hellbabe HB01

  • Submitted by Francesco from Brescia (4 points) on Jun 13, 2014
  • When I bought this pedal I was new in wahs and looking for a cheap one to try it and understand if it would be suitable for my playing style... Well, this pedal is cheap but has a lot of issues that made me think that is not worth the money. First of all: the Hellbabe has a lot of controls but to hear some effect you have to set everything to max (and still I can hear a very weak wah effect).

    If you play heavy distorted sounds you will wonder if it is working or not because the effects is very weak... The case does not look very strong: the plastic is thick but the expression pedal has a metal hinge that sometimes pops out after use. The booster inside is almost unusable, in my opinion it adds hum and sounds very bad (but it works). The leds position is one of the most idiot things I ever seen...
  • Good Points: Cheap
  • Bad Points: Weak effect (especially if distorted), bad pedal response, a bit hummy...
  • Price Paid: US$35.00
  • Purchased At:
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  • Submitted by Karl from Cambridge, MA (24 points) on Jun 18, 2006
  • This is Behringer's all-purpose wah pedal. On the right side of the pedal, it has a selectable sweep range via a large six-position knob, and a push-button to switch on a signal boost while the wah is active. The left side has three mini-knobs to mess with the boost level, the Q (resonance + bandwidth) of the filter, and to fine-tune the frequency range. It also has a seperate output for the wet and dry signals, and can be powered with a battery or a standard 9-volt adapter. The casing is plastic, but pretty heavy-duty, so it would probably withstand some abuse. Sounds perfect, right? Well it would be, except that it has one of the most annoying features ever: an auto-bypass. In other words, it only activates the wah circuit when you're moving the cradle. As soon as the cradle returns to the up position, it SHUTS OFF. This is REALLY annoying, to say the least, and makes the pedal almost completely unusable. (You can adjust the bypass timer with a trimpot accessed through the underside of the pedal, but this is not much comfort.) The frustrating thing is that this appears to be a desicion made at the last minute, as the instruction manual actually shows the pedal with a traditional bypass switch under the cradle. So, I opened up the thing to see if I could fix it somehow. Like many wah pedals, the resistor to control the frequency range is actually an LED/photocell combo; a black piece of plastic with an asymmetric hole lets various amounts of light through as you rock the cradle. As it turns out, the bypass is the same kind of thing. So, to make a bypass switch, you would have to: 1. Cut out some of the plastic, so the light from the LED is always shining on the photoresistor; 2. Snip one of the wires to the LED; and 3. Install a switch between the LED and the rest of the circuit, so that when you activate the switch, the LED lights up. Good luck with that.
  • Good Points: Extremely versatile.
  • Bad Points: Auto-bypass makes it almost unusable.
  • Price Paid: US$35.00
  • Purchased At:
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